3 non-developed countries you never thought to have stronger military power than developed ones

1. Ethiopia: Ethioipia is currently ranked 41 (of 133 countries) according to the GFP review.

Air Power – Includes both fixed-wing and rotary-wing (helicopter) aircraft from all branches of service (Air Force, Navy, Army). Air power is just one important component of the modern military force. Attack Aircraft represents fixed-wing and dedicated forms as well as light strike types (some basic and advanced trainers fill this role). Some fighters can double as attack types and vice versa – this is how multi-role aircraft can be of considerable value. Transport and Trainer aircraft include both fixed-wing and rotary-wing types. z
Image result for ethiopia military

Army Strength – Tank value includes Main Battle Tanks (MBTs) and light tanks (a few remain in service) as well as those vehicles considered “tank destroyers”. There is no distinction made between all-wheel and track-and-wheel designs. Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) value includes Armored Personnel Carriers (APCs) as well as Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs).

Navy Strength – Aircraft Carrier value includes both traditional aircraft carriers as well as “helicopter carrier” warships (the latter growing in popularity worldwide). Cruisers are no longer tracked due to their declining value on the world stage. Submarines value includes both diesel-electric and nuclear-powered types. Total Naval Assets is not simply a sum of the presented navy ship categories – instead it includes all showcased types along with any known / recognized auxiliary vessels (not tracked individually by this site).

The military power of Ethiopia is still stronger than developed countries like Chile, Philippines, Finland.

2. Nigeria: Nigeria is currently ranked 43 (of 133 countries) according to the GFP review.
Image result for nigeria military

Air Power – Includes both fixed-wing and rotary-wing (helicopter) aircraft from all branches of service (Air Force, Navy, Army). Air power is just one important component of the modern military force. Attack Aircraft represents fixed-wing and dedicated forms as well as light strike types (some basic and advanced trainers fill this role). Some fighters can double as attack types and vice versa – this is how multi-role aircraft can be of considerable value. Transport and Trainer aircraft include both fixed-wing and rotary-wing types.

Army Strength – Tank value includes Main Battle Tanks (MBTs) and light tanks (a few remain in service) as well as those vehicles considered “tank destroyers”. There is no distinction made between all-wheel and track-and-wheel designs. Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) value includes Armored Personnel Carriers (APCs) as well as Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs).

Navy Strength – Aircraft Carrier value includes both traditional aircraft carriers as well as “helicopter carrier” warships (the latter growing in popularity worldwide). Cruisers are no longer tracked due to their declining value on the world stage. Submarines value includes both diesel-electric and nuclear-powered types. Total Naval Assets is not simply a sum of the presented navy ship categories – instead it includes all showcased types along with any known / recognized auxiliary vessels (not tracked individually by this site).
The military power of Nigeria is still stronger than developed countries like South Africa, UAE, Finland, Austria.

3. Bangladesh: Bangladesh is currentyly ranked 57 (of 133 countries) according to the GFP review.
Image result for bangladesh military

Air Power – Includes both fixed-wing and rotary-wing (helicopter) aircraft from all branches of service (Air Force, Navy, Army). Air power is just one important component of the modern military force. Attack Aircraft represents fixed-wing and dedicated forms as well as light strike types (some basic and advanced trainers fill this role). Some fighters can double as attack types and vice versa – this is how multi-role aircraft can be of considerable value. Transport and Trainer aircraft include both fixed-wing and rotary-wing types. EXTERNAL LINK: Aircraft throughout the military history of Bangladesh.

Army Strength – Tank value includes Main Battle Tanks (MBTs) and light tanks (a few remain in service) as well as those vehicles considered “tank destroyers”. There is no distinction made between all-wheel and track-and-wheel designs. Armored Fighting Vehicle (AFV) value includes Armored Personnel Carriers (APCs) as well as Infantry Fighting Vehicles (IFVs).

Navy Strength – Aircraft Carrier value includes both traditional aircraft carriers as well as “helicopter carrier” warships (the latter growing in popularity worldwide). Cruisers are no longer tracked due to their declining value on the world stage. Submarines value includes both diesel-electric and nuclear-powered types. Total Naval Assets is not simply a sum of the presented navy ship categories – instead it includes all showcased types along with any known / recognized auxiliary vessels (not tracked individually by this site).

The military power of Bangladesh is still stronger than developed countries like Portugal, Belgium, New Zealand.

What It Is Like to Live in 6 Absolutely Different Countries

There is something exciting about packing up and moving somewhere totally foreign. However, it is not always purely exciting – it can always be truly terrifying. I have lived in six different countries and every time I move I meet new struggles and the latest triumphs.

If you are looking to move to a new country, there are some things you should keep in mind to mentally prepare yourself for this momentous event. It is going to be harder than you imagine, but that is ok because it is also going to be an incredible experience.

Language challenges

The language! Boy is dealing with a different language hard. Of the six countries I’ve lived in, three of them did not speak my native tongue. Dutch, French and German -all languages that I never once studied in school. It can feel awfully isolating when you do not understand what the people around you are saying.

It is even harder when all you want is to go to the grocery store and pick up some yogurt, only to realize you have no idea what you are buying at is – yogurt or mayo or something else entirely. This is an extremely challenging part of living abroad somewhere where they do not speak your native language and it is definitely the one thing I have disliked the most.

With that being said, you get used to being around a different language and you pick phrases up and if you study a bit soon you will be traipsing around the city like a local in no time.

I have found that while it is the hardest part about living in another country, finally being able to order things confidently and converse briefly with people is one of the most rewarding experiences you can have.

More: The Secret Beauty of Living an Eco-Feminist Life

Custom challenges

Another aspect of living in another country is that all of the customs are different. Even if you are moving between two very similar countries, some things are always going to be different.

Originally from the US, I spent a year in Australia and although they spoke my language, ate the same kinds of food and had the same shops as home, it still took getting used to. Pay wave? I can pay for something by just waving my card around? No way! You can imagine my confusion, as this was not something that had made its way to the States yet.

Food challenges

The grocery store sold kangaroo meat, what the heck?! Why couldn’t I find cornmeal? What on earth is a lamington? These small changes may feel like the end of the world when trying to acclimate yourself to a totally new environment where you do not know anyone, I know I sure felt that way.

Everything can feel stressful, but the most amazing thing about living in different countries for me is the people. I have friends now from all corners of the world. Different cultures, different languages and yet we are united by a shared experience in a particular country.

There is only so much you can read about other countries in books – you really have to be there to soak it all in. And that is a pretty incredible experience.

France and Canada: 58th and 59th countries to endorse Safe Schools Declaration

Education International has welcomed the move by France and Canada to endorse the Safe Schools Declaration, committing themselves to protect students, teachers, schools, and universities during times of war.

 

Education International (EI) and its affiliates congratulate the French and Canadian governments for becoming the latest countries to endorse the international political commitment known as the Safe Schools Declaration.The commendation was issued by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack(GCPEA), an inter-agency coalition formed in 2010 to address the issue of targeted attacks on education during armed conflict.

Safe from attack

Keeping education safe from the types of attacks the GCPEA works to highlight is the other dimension to the EI/United Nations Girls’ Education school-related gender-based violence initiative.This initiative seeks to keep schools free from violence that can be committed by students, teachers and education support personnel, who can also all be victims of such violence.

The endorsement came during the international conference on the protection of children in armed conflicts being hosted by the French foreign ministry in Paris on 21 February. This conference marked the 10th anniversary of the Paris Principles and Commitments, dedicated to protecting children from unlawful recruitment or use by armed forces or armed groups.

International support

Fifty-nine countries have now endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration, including most of the European Union and NATO member states. The Safe Schools Declaration is an inter-governmental political commitment that facilitates countries to express support for protecting students, teachers, schools, and universities from attack during times of armed conflict. It stresses the importance of continuing education during armed conflict.

By joining the Declaration, countries pledge to restore access to education when schools are bombed, burned, and destroyed during armed conflict, and undertake to make it less likely that students, teachers, and schools will be attacked in the first place. They agree to deter such violence by promising to investigate and prosecute war crimes involving schools, and to minimise the use of schools for military purposes so they do not become targets for attack.

Armenia and Malta, 60th and 61st countries to endorse Safe Schools Declaration

Education International has welcomed the move by Armenia and Malta to endorse the Safe Schools Declaration, committing itself to protect students, teachers, schools, and universities during times of war.

Education International (EI) and its affiliates congratulate Armenia and Malta’s governments for becoming respectively on 22 and 24 March the 60th and 61st countries to endorse the international political commitment known as the Safe Schools Declaration.The commendation was issued by the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack (GCPEA), an inter-agency coalition formed in 2010 to address the issue of targeted attacks on education during armed conflict.

International support

Armenia’s endorsement means that the majority of Council of Europe member states have now endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration. Also, Malta’s endorsement of the Safe Schools Declaration is particularly timely as it currently holds the presidency of the European Union.

This Declaration is an inter-governmental political commitment that facilitates countries to express support for protecting students, teachers, schools, and universities from attack during times of armed conflict. It stresses the importance of continuing education during armed conflict.

By joining the Declaration, countries pledge to restore access to education when schools are bombed, burned, and destroyed during armed conflict, and undertake to make it less likely that students, teachers, and schools will be attacked in the first place. They agree to deter such violence by promising to investigate and prosecute war crimes involving schools, and to minimise the use of schools for military purposes so they do not become targets for attack.

Background

The Declaration was developed through consultations with states in a process led by Norway and Argentina in Geneva, Switzerland, and opened for endorsement at the Oslo Conference on Safe Schools in 2015. This latest endorsement occurs just before the Second International Safe Schools Conference, to be co-hosted by the Argentine ministries of foreign affairs and defense in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 28-29 March.The Conference will gather representatives of over 60 states to discuss ways to better implement the Declaration, including by incorporating the Guidelines to Protect Schools and Universities from Military Use during Armed Conflict into military doctrine; improving monitoring and reporting of attacks; investigating education-related violations of humanitarian and human rights law; supporting conflict-sensitive education policies; and introducing measures to better ensure the continuation of safe education during conflict.