10 Incredible Buddha Bowls to Update Your Diet

Buddha bowls are typically viewed as a complicated meal that only professional nutritionists are able to make. But in reality, even the laziest girl in the world can make it herself. Buddha bowls are known for their versatility, healthy nutrients, and variety. One bowl can keep your energy going all day long and boost your overall wellness. While Buddha bowls are easy to make, perhaps you find yourself confusing about what to put into your bowl.

1. Sweet Potato Chickpea Buddha Bowl


Sweet Potato Chickpea Buddha Bowl
Subtly spiced, comforting and amazingly delicious, this Buddha bowl will rock your entire world in a jiffy. Get the recipe here.

2. Noodle Buddha Bowl


Noodle Buddha Bowl
Fuel your brain and make your stomach happy with a protein- and antioxidant-packed bowl. Find the recipe here.

3. Turmeric Sweet Potato Bowl


Turmeric Sweet Potato Bowl
The main spice in curry, turmeric can turn any meal into a masterpiece. Spice up your sweet potato bowl with this spice for added healing properties. Get the recipe here.

4. Spinach Quinoa Patty Bowl


Spinach Quinoa Patty Bowl
When superfoods combined together, they create a fantastically healthy Buddha super bowl that will provide your body with so much needed phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals, and other compounds that are crucial for your health. Get the recipe here.

5. Brussels Sprouts Eggplant Buddha Bowl


Brussels Sprouts Eggplant Buddha Bowl
One of my favorite Buddha bowls, this one is a true goodness for health food junkies. Plus, it is so fast to make. Get the recipe here.

6. Vegan Thai Tempeh Buddha Bowl


Vegan Thai Tempeh Buddha Bowl
Rich in protein, a Thai tempeh Buddha bowl is an excellent way to get this vital nutrient when you go vegan. Find the recipe here.

7. BBQ Tempeh With Vegan Ranch Bowl


BBQ Tempeh With Vegan Ranch Bowl
After all, the barbecue season is approaching so fast. Get the recipe here.

8. Winter Buddha Bowl


Winter Buddha Bowl
But since it is the cold season outside, enjoy your comforting and satisfying winter Buddha bowl right now. Get the recipe here.

9. Roasted Rainbow Winter Bowl


Roasted Rainbow Winter Bowl
Mix up your favorite healthy foods in one rainbow-inspired meal. Find the recipe here.

10. Moroccan Couscous, Chickpeas, and Olives Bowl


Moroccan Couscous, Chickpeas, and Olives Bowl
Nutrient-packed Buddha bowl is a great way to update your diet and help you drop a few pounds along the way. Get the recipe here.

All these Buddha bowls are perfect for your waistline when you enjoy them in moderation. The next time hunger strikes out of the sky, allow yourself to cook one of these bowls.

7 Healthy Foods to Eat to Increase Your Vitamin E Intake

Your body needs vitamin E to work properly and it’s important to pay attention to your vitamin E intake on a regular basis. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant, which helps combat free radical damage and prevent a great number of health issues, including heart disease and cancer. This nutrient also plays an important role in gene expression, cell health and immunity. The great news is that there are certain foods that help boost vitamin E intake. Without further ado, here are seven healthy foods you can eat to increase your vitamin E intake.

1. Kiwi
Kiwi contains around 10% of your daily requirements of vitamin E, and it’s also rich in fiber and vitamin C. Kiwis are sweet and tart at the same time and I usually have one kiwi for my breakfast with my favorite cereal. I also love adding sliced kiwis to my smoothies, fruit salad and Greek yogurt. I think kiwi is one of the best fruits to eat to increase vitamin E intake.

2. Sunflower seeds
Eating sunflowers seeds is one of the best and easiest ways to increase your vitamin E intake. An ounce of sunflower seeds contains over one-third of your daily requirements. Eat them plain or add some to your vegetable salad. Sunflower seeds also work well in trail mix combined with raisins, dried cereal and chocolate. Every time I go on a road trip, I always take a bag of sunflower seeds to boost my vitamin E intake.

3. Mangoes
Who doesn’t love mangoes? I’m sure most of you love this amazing fruit! Now that you know mangoes can help you increase your Vitamin E intake, you might love them even more. A ½ cup of chopped or diced mango contains about 5% of your daily Vitamin E needs. While it may not be enough to satisfy the whole day’s need, it’s definitely a great and tasty way to contribute. You can add mangoes to your yogurt, smoothies, or mix them with diced red onion, chopped jalapenos and avocado for a delicious salsa.

4. Tomatoes
Whether cooked or raw, tomatoes are also a good source of vitamin E. Again, eating tomatoes isn’t enough to satisfy your whole day’s quota, but still you can get a bit of essential vitamin. Put tomatoes on burgers and sandwiches, or add them to your vegetable salad. Whip up some spaghetti sauce or salsa or mix several tomatoes with fresh basil, mozzarella cheese and balsamic vinegar for a delicious side dish.

5. Almonds
Like sunflower seeds, almonds are a good source of Vitamin E. You can eat almonds as a snack or put some in your oatmeal, cereal or batch of muffins. Almonds are also a wonderful choice for your trail mix and plain yogurt with some fruits and honey. Since almonds have many calories, make sure you don’t consume pounds of them daily, or you could gain a few unwanted pounds.

6. Spinach
Another healthy food to eat to boost your vitamin E intake is spinach. Half a cup of spinach provides 10% of your daily vitamin E needs. You can use fresh spinach in your salad, vegetable soup or put spinach into your turkey sandwich. The options are endless. Spinach is low in calories, so you don’t have to worry about your weight.

7. Peanut butter
You know, seeds and nuts are great options for increasing vitamin E intake. Peanut butter is another great option because it works for numerous things. Spread peanut butter on toast at breakfast or eat a jelly and peanut butter sandwich for your lunch. You can also mix it with soy sauce and olive oil for a yummy peanut sauce on your favorite pasta. You may also like peanut butter on pancakes and waffles. If you don’t want to eat peanut butter, whole peanuts are the perfect choice too.

Add a few of these vitamin E rich foods to your diet to ensure you’re getting enough of this essential vitamin. What are your favorite foods on this list? What do you eat to boost your vitamin E intake?

10 Foods to Eat to Fight Stress

There are many ways to combat stress, but one of the best ways is to consume stress-fighting foods. Most of us live in a hectic, crazy, busy world where stress is almost inevitable. While a little stress can be good for you, when you are constantly feeling stressed out, overwhelmed and anxious, it can cause huge damage to your health, your productivity, your mood, and even your relationships.

Too much or prolonged stress can even lead to short-term and long-term physical problems, such as high blood pressure, impaired memory, osteoporosis, coronary heart disease and a weak immune system. Eating stress-fighting foods, exercising on a regular basis and practicing yoga can help you reduce your stress levels and improve your mood without any medications. Today we’re on a journey to discovering the best foods that can help us fight stress and live a more peaceful life. Read on…

1. Brown rice
Brown rice is an excellent source of B-vitamins, which are essential for the proper function of all tissues, cells, and organs. B-vitamins promote heart, immune, brain health as well as healthy mood. Eating brown rice can help you combat stress and prevent different types of mood disorders. If you often experience moodiness, try including brown rice into your healthy diet and enjoy a stress-free life.

2. Spinach
Spinach is packed with Vitamins A, C and B-vitamins and is rich in potassium, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium, which help decrease stress hormones in your body, stabilize your mood and make you feel better. One cup of spinach will be enough to help your body combat stress. You can use spinach in your salad, smoothie, omelet, and sandwiches.

3. Salmon
Salmon is a super-nutritious food that can work miracles on your body. It’s high in omega-3 fatty acids that increase happy brain chemicals such as serotonin and help regulate stress hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol. Moreover, omega-3 fatty acids help improve your brain function. Try eating 2 to 3 servings of salmon per week to reduce your stress levels. If you don’t like salmon, opt for another oily fish like sardines, tuna and mackerel.

4. Green tea
Green tea is loaded with potent antioxidants like polyphenols, catechins and flavonoids, and boasts numerous powerful health benefits. Drinking green tea has calming effect on your mind and body, thus helps reduce stress. Next time you feel overwhelmed and stressed out, take a short break and drink a cup of green tea. If you are not a green tea lover, you can opt for chamomile or mint tea. Although I like black tea, I can’t recommend you to drink it to reduce stress. If you want to reap all the health benefits of green tea, avoid smoking cigarette and drinking alcohol.

5. Avocado
One of the best foods to eat to fight stress is avocado. Avocado is a great source of protein, essential minerals, vitamin E and vitamin C. It also contains potassium, fiber and healthy fat. Avocado helps keep the nerve cells and the brain cells healthy and help to reduce your stress levels. Moreover, avocado may help lower blood cholesterol levels and reduce risk for heart disease. You can eat avocado fresh or add it to your salads and smoothies.

6. Blueberries
Antioxidant-rich food, blueberries, can also help you fight stress. Blueberries are rich in vitamin E and vitamin C, manganese and magnesium, which are helpful in lowering the stress levels. Eating blueberries regularly helps to fight insomnia, depression and other mood disorders. Due to rich fiber content and low calorie level, blueberries aid in weight loss. Add some blueberries to your oatmeal, Greek yogurt, fruit salad, or eat them with cottage cheese. If you don’t like blueberries, you can opt for cranberries instead.

7. Oranges
Oranges are packed with vitamin C, vitamin A and B vitamins. They help fight the free radicals related to stress and heart disease. One of the best ways to enjoy the health benefits of oranges is to drink a glass of fresh orange juice each day. I also add oranges to my fruit salad, desserts and water. A few slices of orange or a glass of orange juice will help you fight stress in no time.

8. Dark chocolate
Consuming an ounce and a half of dark chocolate each day can lower the level of stress hormones in highly stressed people. The thing is, dark chocolate is rich in magnesium, an important mineral that helps combat fatigue, stress, irritability and even depression. While many people like dark chocolate, there are people, including me, who don’t like it. If you are one of them, opt for chocolate milk or dark chocolate desserts whenever you feel stressed out. It will reduce your stress levels and boost your mood.

9. Almonds
Get some stress-relief eating almonds, which contain vitamins E, B2, zinc, magnesium and healthy oils. Moreover, almonds are an excellent source of fiber. When I have a hard, stressful day, I usually snack on raw almonds. It helps me cope with stress better and faster. I also add almonds to my desserts and baked goods. If you don’t feel like eating almonds, you can munch on pistachios and walnuts to boost your energy level and reduce your stress hormones.

10. Milk
It has been proven that people who drink milk on a regular basis feel less stressed. Milk is rich in calcium, vitamins A, D, protein and antioxidants, which help to combat the free radicals that get released when you feel stressed out. A glass of warm skim milk can help you calm down in no time. If you’re suffering from stress-related insomnia, try drinking a glass of warm milk before hitting the sack and you will have much better sleep. If you don’t drink milk, consider consuming yogurt or almond milk.

Stress affects all aspects of your life and it’s important to know ways to fight it. Improve your mood, boost your energy levels and reduce your stress levels with these healthy foods to eat to fight stress. Just don’t forget to exercise daily; running is a proven way to combat stress. Have you ever tried eating foods to fight stress? What’s your favorite food to eat to cope with stress better?

5 Healthy Ways to Detox This Spring

Although a healthy body has the ability to detoxify itself, not all of us has healthy bodies. The winter season with its comfort foods, lazy days and long nights took its toll on our bodies. Now it is time to get your body functions back on track, get rid of winter bloating and start preparing for the bikini season. Follow these five steps to cleansing your body naturally and eliminate the toxins from your life.

 

Healthy Ways to Detox This Spring

1. Start your morning with fruit-infused water
Instead of drinking a cup of your favorite coffee or black tea, sip your way to a toxin-free, healthy body. Start your morning with a glass of fruit-infused water. Make sure you do not add sugar and honey to it.

Lemon, lime, berry or kiwi water is a much healthier alternative to coffee and black tea that helps to cleanse the body as well as boost the immune system. Green tea is a healthy drink too unless you buy a cheap version and add sugar to it.

2. Get your heart pumping
Exercise stimulates the body and helps it cleanse itself. It improves the blood and lymph circulation, allowing the liver and lymph nodes to cleanse the fluids that contain white blood cells that flow through the body. Moreover, exercise opens up the sweat glands and helps to cleanse the skin through perspiration.

Running, bicycling, walking, jump roping, swimming, yoga and pilates are all good exercises for detoxifying your body. Do not overdo it, though. 10 minutes each morning or 20-30 minutes three times a week will be enough to promote your spring detox, not to mention that you may drop a few pounds. Stay hydrated and drink water before and after your morning workout routine.

3. Enjoy a healthy breakfast
If you are experiencing a heavy winter bloat, a nutrient-dense green smoothie must be your breakfast choice. If you are looking just to cleanse your body, a green smoothie and a healthy spring salad with one hard-boiled egg or spinach omelet for breakfast will do the trick.

The same goes for lunch and dinner. Choose your food combo carefully and eliminate any meal that you know may cause bloating. Consume more organic fruit and vegetables as well as nuts and seeds. Leafy greens have plenty of detoxing properties. Including them in your spring menu is a surefire way to detox and increase your energy level.

4. Eliminate bloating
Bloating is something that we can’t talk freely about, even at home. It may seem like a temporary problem when in reality it may become a permanent one. Incorporating bloat-fighting foods such as dandelion, cucumber, papaya, banana, ginger, asparagus, fennel seeds, chamomile, and peppermint into your daily meal plan is an effective way to eliminate bloating naturally.

5. Head to a sauna
Sauna helps to eliminate waste through perspiration. Plus, it helps to burn 63 to 84 calories in 30 minutes. But this option is not for everyone. Consult your doctor before relaxing in a sauna for 30 minutes. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water to balance your pH levels.

We typically go through the winter months in storage mode. All we do is stay warm and eat comfort food. Spring changes it all. Welcome the new weather and season full of fresh produce with these simple ways to detox the body.

Nanobionic Spinach Plants Can Detect Explosives

After sensing dangerous chemicals, the carbon-nanotube-enhanced plants send an alert.

Spinach is no longer just a superfood: By embedding leaves with carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have transformed spinach plants into sensors that can detect explosives and wirelessly relay that information to a handheld device similar to a smartphone.

This is one of the first demonstrations of engineering electronic systems into plants, an approach that the researchers call “plant nanobionics.”

“The goal of plant nanobionics is to introduce nanoparticles into the plant to give it non-native functions,” says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and the leader of the research team.

In this case, the plants were designed to detect chemical compounds known as nitroaromatics, which are often used in landmines and other explosives. When one of these chemicals is present in the groundwater sampled naturally by the plant, carbon nanotubes embedded in the plant leaves emit a fluorescent signal that can be read with an infrared camera. The camera can be attached to a small computer similar to a smartphone, which then sends an email to the user.

“This is a novel demonstration of how we have overcome the plant/human communication barrier,” says Strano, who believes plant power could also be harnessed to warn of pollutants and environmental conditions such as drought.

Strano is the senior author of a paper describing the nanobionic plants in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Materials. The paper’s lead authors are Min Hao Wong, an MIT graduate student who has started a company called Plantea to further develop this technology, and Juan Pablo Giraldo, a former MIT postdoc who is now an assistant professor at the University of California at Riverside.

Environmental monitoring

Two years ago, in the first demonstration of plant nanobionics, Strano and Giraldo used nanoparticles to enhance plants’ photosynthesis ability and to turn them into sensors for nitric oxide, a pollutant produced by combustion.

Plants are ideally suited for monitoring the environment because they already take in a lot of information from their surroundings, Strano says.

“Plants are very good analytical chemists,” he says. “They have an extensive root network in the soil, are constantly sampling groundwater, and have a way to self-power the transport of that water up into the leaves.”

Strano’s lab has previously developed carbon nanotubes that can be used as sensors to detect a wide range of molecules, including hydrogen peroxide, the explosive TNT, and the nerve gas sarin. When the target molecule binds to a polymer wrapped around the nanotube, it alters the tube’s fluorescence.

In the new study, the researchers embedded sensors for nitroaromatic compounds into the leaves of spinach plants. Using a technique called vascular infusion, which involves applying a solution of nanoparticles to the underside of the leaf, they placed the sensors into a leaf layer known as the mesophyll, which is where most photosynthesis takes place.

They also embedded carbon nanotubes that emit a constant fluorescent signal that serves as a reference. This allows the researchers to compare the two fluorescent signals, making it easier to determine if the explosive sensor has detected anything. If there are any explosive molecules in the groundwater, it takes about 10 minutes for the plant to draw them up into the leaves, where they encounter the detector.

To read the signal, the researchers shine a laser onto the leaf, prompting the nanotubes in the leaf to emit near-infrared fluorescent light. This can be detected with a small infrared camera connected to a Raspberry Pi, a $35 credit-card-sized computer similar to the computer inside a smartphone. The signal could also be detected with a smartphone by removing the infrared filter that most camera phones have, the researchers say.

“This setup could be replaced by a cell phone and the right kind of camera,” Strano says. “It’s just the infrared filter that would stop you from using your cell phone.”

Using this setup, the researchers can pick up a signal from about 1 meter away from the plant, and they are now working on increasing that distance.

Michael McAlpine, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesota, says this approach holds great potential for engineering not only sensors but many other kinds of bionic plants that might receive radio signals or change color.

“When you have manmade materials infiltrated into a living organism, you can have plants do things that plants don’t ordinarily do,” says McAlpine, who was not involved in the research. “Once you start to think of living organisms like plants as biomaterials that can be combined with electronic materials, this is all possible.”

“A wealth of information”

In the 2014 plant nanobionics study, Strano’s lab worked with a common laboratory plant known as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the researchers wanted to use common spinach plants for the latest study, to demonstrate the versatility of this technique. “You can apply these techniques with any living plant,” Strano says.

So far, the researchers have also engineered spinach plants that can detect dopamine, which influences plant root growth, and they are now working on additional sensors, including some that track the chemicals plants use to convey information within their own tissues.

“Plants are very environmentally responsive,” Strano says. “They know that there is going to be a drought long before we do. They can detect small changes in the properties of soil and water potential. If we tap into those chemical signaling pathways, there is a wealth of information to access.”

These sensors could also help botanists learn more about the inner workings of plants, monitor plant health, and maximize the yield of rare compounds synthesized by plants such as the Madagascar periwinkle, which produces drugs used to treat cancer.

“These sensors give real-time information from the plant. It is almost like having the plant talk to us about the environment they are in,” Wong says. “In the case of precision agriculture, having such information can directly affect yield and margins.”

Slow Cooker Spinach Artichoke Chicken Recipe

Ever had spinach and artichoke dip in a restaurant? This recipe is similar to that but with more protein and no chips. I had a craving for spinach and artichoke dip one night and decided to turn it into a whole dinner: spinach artichoke chicken in a slow-cooker.

Spinach Artichoke Chicken

The chicken is topped with spinach, artichokes and a mix of cheeses for a very protein rich (and low carb) quick meal that can be easily made in the crock pot or on the stove.

Some kids might not like the strong flavors in the artichokes, but mine really enjoyed this recipe. We served it with homemade Caesar salad and it was wonderful!

This can be made in a slow cooker or just baked in the oven for about an hour.

3 votes

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Spinach and Artichoke Chicken Recipe

prep 10 mins

cook 4 hours

total 4 hours, 10 mins

author wellness mama

yield 4 -6

A protein packed take on spinach and artichoke dip that uses chicken as a base for a delicious meal…

Ingredients

2 lbs of chicken breast or strips (or one of those bags of frozen chicken)
1 package of frozen chopped spinach, very well drained
1 large (about 15 ounce) jar of marinated artichoke hearts
1 package of cream cheese
1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
1/2 cup Mozzarella Cheese (optional)
Garlic powder, salt, pepper
Instructions

Chop chicken into bite sized pieces, season with garlic, salt and pepper and place in crock pot for 2 hours (on high) or 4 hours (on low) [Note: This can vary by crock pot.]
When chicken is almost cooked, add the well drained spinach, can of artichoke hearts, cream cheese, and parmesan cheese.
Cook for another hour until cheeses are well melted and stir to incorporate flavors.
Top with mozzarella cheese and serve.
courses slow-cooker

Spinach Artichoke Chicken Salad Recipe

I love spinach artichoke dip at restaurants, but not being a fan of GMO-pesticide-filled-and-vegetable-oil-cooked-corn-chips makes dip not so fun! I love the flavors of this dip and wanted to figure out a way to incorporate them in a healthy salad that also included protein, thus my Spinach Artichoke Chicken salad was born.

Spinach Artichoke Salad?

This recipe is a cooler variation of my slow cooker spinach artichoke chicken recipe that is more refreshing in warmer months. The flavors of spinach and artichoke are classic, but in this salad version I use fresh spinach as a delicious variation.

This recipe is very easy to make and is a delicious and fresh salad. It has the same taste as Spinach Artichoke dip but the dairy is optional. The flavors are much more fresh and it is a great meal on the go.

4 votes

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Spinach Artichoke Chicken

prep 10 mins

total 10 mins

author wellness mama

yield 2

A protein filled take on the classic Spinach and Artichoke Dip over salad. Dairy optional. A quick lunch idea!

Ingredients

2 pounds of cooked and chopped chicken breast and thighs
4 cups (or more) fresh spinach
1 large (about 15 ounce) jar of marinated artichoke hearts (without vegetable oil or chemical ingredients)
1/2 cup feta cheese (optional- to top)
1/4 cup Mozzarella Cheese (optional)
1/4 cup homemade Caesar dressing or a drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar
Instructions

Chop cooked chicken into bite sized pieces.
Put chopped chicken on top of fresh spinach.
Top with artichoke hearts, feta and mozzarella (if using)
Top with homemade caesar dressing or dressing of choice.
Notes

If you prefer not to use the crock pot, you can place chicken in a baking dish, add other ingredients except cheese on top and bake approximately 1 hour or until chicken is cooked.

courses main

cuisine american

Grain Free Flatbread with Spinach and Egg

I’m so excited to share this Grain-Free Flatbread recipe with you—it’s become a favorite in my house and I know you’ll love it, too! There are three parts to this recipe, but it’s actually really easy to put together. You can also make any of the three recipes as a stand-alone side dish.

When making the switch to grain free, one of the biggest things most people miss is baked goods…

I’ve tinkered and toyed with so many different gluten- and grain-free recipes and this one is by far my favorite for flatbread. Of course, these “alternative” flours can get expensive—especially if you’re like me and like recipe testing and trying new things. TIP: I get all my ingredients for this recipe at Thrive Market—they have everything I need at huge discounts, delivered right to my “test kitchen” for free!

The flatbread is so versatile. You can turn it into a pizza (my kids love that!), use it to scoop up dips or simply top it with some (grass-fed!) butter and jam. My favorite way to eat this flatbread is to make it into little English muffin-sized rounds and top them with creamed spinach and an egg fried up in lard, which I also get at Thrive Market since they sell my favorite brand for less than I’ve seen it anywhere else!

It’s great for breakfast (a clean, healthy, modern take on Eggs Florentine) or do as we do in my family every so often and enjoy it as breakfast-for-dinner!

3 votes

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Grain Free Flatbread with Spinach and Egg

prep 10 mins

cook 10 mins

total 20 mins

author wellness mama

yield 4

Paleo flatbread with creamed spinach and fried egg is a delicious meal for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

Ingredients

1/2 cup almond flour
1/4 cup arrowroot flour
1/4 cup tapioca flour
2 tablespoons coconut flour
3/4 teaspoon pink himalayan salt
1/2 cup water
Coconut oil or ghee for greasing the pan
Instructions

Whisk all the flours and salt together. Combine with the water until completely smooth.
Heat a nonstick skillet over medium heat. With a paper towel dipped in your coconut oil or ghee, lightly grease the pan.
Pour a third of the batter into the pan. Let the bread cook and firm up on one side before flipping the batter. Cook the breads for roughly 2 minutes on each side, then reduce the heat, cover, and cook until firm and golden, taking care not to burn. Repeat for the other two breads.
courses main

Like this recipe? Check out my new cookbook, or get all my recipes (over 500!) in a personalized weekly meal planner here!

Coconut Creamed Spinach

1 lb baby spinach
2 shallots, thinly sliced
1 clove garlic, minced
3/4 cup coconut milk
1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
Juice and zest of 1 lemon
Sea salt and pepper
Coconut oil
What to do?

Heat a knob of coconut oil in a large skillet and cook the spinach until just wilted. Transfer the spinach to a colander to drain out the excess water.
In a small saucepan, sweat the shallots and garlic. Whisk in the coconut milk, dijon, lemon juice, and nutmeg. Cook and reduce slightly.
Press all the excess water out of the spinach and return to the large skillet over medium heat. Pour in the coconut milk mixture, stir, and heat until warmed. Be careful not to overcook—we want the spinach to still stay bright in color!
Season with salt, pepper, and lemon zest. Serve warm.
Fried Egg

A knob of lard
3 organic eggs
Maldon salt
Heat some lard in a frying pan over medium heat. Crack in three eggs and let the edges crisp up. Cover and reduce the heat slightly so that the whites become firm but the yolks stay nice and runny. Top with a sprinkling of Maldon’s perfect flaky sea salt.

Lentil-Spinach Salad With Feta and Grapes

Canada produces most of the world’s lentils. They are so versatile and take well to all kinds of flavours – especially vinegar – which makes them a perfect addition to any salad.

Servings Cook Time
4 15minutes
Ingredients
1  shallot thinly sliced
3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1  can small brown lentils drained and rinsed
1  carrot very finely chopped
1/4 cup cold-pressed canola oil or extra-virgin olive oil
fresh black pepper to taste
8 cups packed baby spinach
1 cup seedless red grapes sliced in half
1 cup crumbled feta cheese
Instructions
Combine shallot with vinegar, sugar and salt in a large bowl. Stir and let stand for 15 minutes or until lightly pickled.
Stir in lentils, carrot and oil. Season with pepper.
Add spinach; toss well to combine.
Divide among 4 plates; top with grapes and feta.
Recipe Notes
Per serving:  610 calories, 32 g protein, 23 g fat (7 g saturated fat), 70 g carbohydrates, 31 g fibre, 33 mg cholesterol, 630 mg sodium