5 Exercises To Get Rid Of Underarm Fat And Breast Side Fat

5 Exercises To Get Rid Of Underarm Fat And Breast Side Fat

Today, it’s not so much about being skinny. Rather social media and society, in general, like to promote a healthy body. Though dieting is a big part of that, exercising has a huge role in this as well. We all may have different bodies, but we all want to be our healthiest and look our healthiest.

When you have areas that you might feel have excess fat, that may cause those areas to look slightly bigger. Men and women experience different parts that they feel store the most excess fat. For women, those problem areas are usually their thighs, buttocks, and arms.

If you are someone who is having difficulty figuring out where to start to lose underarm and breast side fat, stop worrying. Most likely, it’s not even excess weight but some insufficiently developed muscle of the arms and chest. These are all easy exercises that, over time, add up to some great results.

1. Dumbbell Floor Press. The first exercise that you can do to help out those frustrating areas is the dumbbell floor press. According to Women Fitness, this exercise is a pure upper body movement, allowing you to press some heavy weights without hurting your shoulders and back. The site notes that all you have to do is lie on your back on the floor and push up the dumbbells up so your arms go directly over your shoulders. Women Fitness also notes that pressing one arm at a time will “increase the core demands of the exercise, as you have to brace to keep your torso steady”.

Before we get to the next exercise it is important to realize that everyone experiences those annoying folds of skin between your arm and your breast. So if you feel like you are the only one that struggles, don’t! It’s super common. According to Women’s Health Magazine, “all of us store weight in certain places based on our genetics. So if you’re trying to lose a little from a certain spot, you need to focus on losing overall body fat.”

The magazine continues by noting that diet has a huge role in all of this. So, although these exercises can help you gain muscle and reduce the fat, if you are eating fattening food, these exercises won’t help! Women’s Health writes that you need to make it a point to take in less calories than you are “expending overall (not just via exercise)”.

2. Staggered Push Ups. Alright, back to the exercises. Shape.com is a fitness site and they’ve released a 30-day-challenge HIIT workout. One of the exercises they’ve included is the staggered push-up and that’s the exercise that’ll help you with underarm and breast side fat. The site notes that unlike regular push-ups, with these you have to have one hand slightly back and the other slightly in front of you. Then you do the push-up!

As previously mentioned, you can be working out as hard as ever, but if you aren’t eating the right foods, you won’t see the results you want. According to Livestrong, the best pre- and post-training meals for most exercises typically have a combo of high-quality protein, high-quality carbohydrates, healthy fats and some fruit and veggies. But everyone’s body is different so you need to find what works for you and your lifestyle!

3. Dumbbell floor fly. To perform this exercise, you must keep your back straight, lean forward and bring the weights together in front of you until your arms form a circle. LiveStrong notes that any form of standing dumbbell training works a lot of muscles in your upper body. But form is very crucial. The site notes that having poor form can cause shoulder impingement.

4. Dumbbell rows. They are noted by muscleandfitness.com to be the most basic exercise that “strengthens the back, shoulders, and biceps while actively engaging the core throughout the movement”. The site also notes that dumbbells are a crucial aspect for this exercise (as well as all the other ones) because they not only create muscle, they create balance and stability on both sides of the body. Don’t be afraid to lift and create muscles; it’ll create such a difference.

5. Dips. According to livestrong.com, dips are exercises that go a long way for those annoying, flabby areas of your body. They write, “dips are intense and effective isolation exercises that help develop powerful and defined triceps”. They’re also exercises that you can do just about anywhere. That’s why the last exercise on this list is the bench dip. Just position your hand shoulder-width apart on a bench or chair. With your legs straight out in front of you, simply move up and down, with a pause at the bottom!

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This Woman Hit the Beach with Loose Skin After Losing 350 Pounds. Here’s Her Message to the Haters

Blogger Jacqueline Adan used to weigh 500 pounds. She avoided bathing suits at all costs and wouldn’t dream of wearing one in public without a cover-up. So when she dropped 350 pounds by exercising and eating clean, she finally felt ready to step into a swimsuit again.

The only problem? Obnoxious onlookers who snickered at her loose skin, a common side effect of dramatic weight loss.

“I was nervous to take my cover up off and to walk into the pool or walk on the beach,” Adan wrote in the caption of a photo she posted on Instagram this week. In the picture, she’s wearing nothing but a wetsuit and a big smile while vacationing in Mexico. Even after undergoing skin removal surgeries, Adan still has excess skin on her body.

In the photo, Adan looks elated. But “I still felt like that same 500 pound girl,” she continued in her post. “Then it happened. A couple sitting by the pool started laughing and pointing at me and making fun of me as soon as I took my cover up off.”

The body positive icon, who has 47K Instagram followers, could have let their obnoxious reaction ruin her day. Instead, she took a deep breath, smiled, and made her way into the pool.

“That was a huge moment for me,” she wrote. “I had changed. I was not the same girl anymore.” While she confessed that the teasing bothered her, the experience showed her how far she’d come not only physically but also emotionally.

“I am not going to let what other people think of me stop me from living my life,” she vowed in her post. “They do not know me. They do not know how I have worked my ass off to lose 350 pounds. They do not know how I am recovering from major surgeries. They have no right to sit and point and laugh at me.”

So Adan unapologetically rocked her wetsuit and went on enjoying her vacation. “What matters is how you react to it,” she said. “How you feel about yourself. Loving yourself just the way you are is hard. Others might not like that. That’s ok. I hope you love yourself. Love your body. I hope you keep doing you and just keep smiling!”

This Rare but Deadly Complication of Liposuction Almost Killed a Woman. Here’s What Doctors Want You to Know

Liposuction is big business: A recent study found that it was 2016’s second most popular type of plastic surgery in the United States (after breast augmentation), with an average cost per procedure of $3,200. Overall, about 235,000 fat-sucking operations were performed last year.

And while the procedure is generally safe, a new article in BMJ Case Reports highlights a complication that nearly cost one 45-year-old woman her life. The paper details doctors’ experience diagnosing and treating a patient who developed a rare but serious condition called fat embolization syndrome shortly after a routine nip and tuck.

Fat embolization occurs when globules of fat break free from surrounding tissue and travel through the body, becoming lodged in blood vessels or the lungs and blocking the flow of blood or oxygen. It’s common after bone fractures or major trauma, but it has also been documented—at least two other times in medical literature—after liposuction.

Unfortunately, the doctors wrote in their report, the condition is “notoriously difficult to diagnose,” and many plastic surgeons don’t know that they should be on the lookout for symptoms.

In their paper, the doctors recall the case of an obese British woman who had undergone lower leg and knee liposuction two days earlier at a local hospital. “The surgery had been planned to remove some of the bulk of her lower legs to help her mobilize and subsequently begin the weight loss process,” they wrote.

The procedure itself was uneventful, and about 10 liters of fat were removed from the woman’s lower body. About 36 hours after the operation, however, the woman became drowsy and confused, and doctors noticed her heart rate was unusually high.

The woman’s condition worsened, and she was transferred to the intensive care unit, where doctors determined she had dangerously low oxygen levels in her body. After further tests, doctors realized that her symptoms were caused by fat embolization.

Once a diagnosis was made, the woman was treated with oxygen and drugs to help restore her oxygen levels, heart rate, and breathing to normal. She recovered fully and was released from the hospital after two weeks. But if not for her doctors’ quick thinking, things could have been much worse.

Fat embolization is not only hard to recognize, say the report’s authors, but there is no standardized set of criteria to help physicians make an official diagnosis. Although liposuction is not usually considered a high-risk procedure, people who are morbidly obese, who have fluid retention, or who have large volumes of fat removed are more likely to suffer from complications, they say.

Anyone considering liposuction or any other type of cosmetic surgery should talk with their doctor about the potential benefits and risks; it’s also important to interview surgeons carefully and choose one who’s certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery. Make sure he or she operates in an accredited hospital or medical facility. Don’t fall for non-licensed “pros” who tout cosmetic surgery on social media.

If you do choose to go under the knife, following your surgeon’s post-op instructions can help reduce your risk of dangerous complications. But as with any medical procedure, always speak up if something doesn’t feel right.

Is Ice Cream Healthy? A Nutritionist’s Take on Halo Top and Other ‘Healthier’ Brands

OK, I’m just going to say right up front that as a nutritionist, I would never categorize ice cream as health food per se. But lately several seemingly healthier versions of the sweet stuff have appeared on the market, and a few brands are flying off supermarket shelves. Before you grab a spoon and dig into any of these better-for-you pints, here’s a look at a few popular options, and what you should keep in mind.

Adding nutrients doesn’t automatically make ice cream healthy

Halo Top made headlines this month when it became the best-selling pint of ice cream in the country, surpassing top brands like Ben & Jerry’s. In addition to milk, cream, and eggs, Halo Top’s ingredients include fiber, milk protein concentrate, and the sweeteners stevia and erythritol. The latter is a type of sugar alcohol, which tastes sweet but doesn’t get absorbed like regular sugar, or raise blood sugar levels.

As a result, a pint of Halo Top contains just 240 calories, with up to 24 grams of protein, and nearly 50% of the Daily Value for fiber. That’s a better nutritional profile than traditional ice cream. But still, Halo Top is a treat—just one with less sugar, fewer calories, and more protein and fiber.

In other words, it’s not a good idea to polish off a pint every night—or to eat one in place of dinner (which a few of my clients admit they occasionally do). Another caveat: Erythritol can cause bloating and gas in some people.

You may not feel as satisfied

Enlightened, which is marketed as “ice cream that’s good for you,” is similar to Halo Top. The product’s makers start with skim milk and add milk protein isolate (to bump up the protein), fiber, erythritol, and monk fruit extract—another natural, no-calorie sweetener that has become popular alongside stevia. The macro-nutrient numbers are pretty similar to Halo Top’s. It’s worth mentioning that like stevia, monk fruit extract is 150 to 300 times sweeter than sugar. Anecdotally, some of my clients find that the intense sweetness actually stokes their sweet tooth, rather than satisfying it. And some say they don’t like the aftertaste.

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A pint shouldn’t be a single serving

Snow Monkey, which is currently only available in two flavors (cacao and goji berry), is a dairy-free ice cream alternative made from bananas, hemp seed protein powder, sunflower butter, and either fruit or maple syrup as the sweetener. While not that low-cal at about 400 calories per pint, it provides 20 grams of protein, and nearly half of the daily recommended fiber intake. A full pint of the cacao also packs over 60% of a day’s iron and vitamin C needs. Impressive, but remember, polishing off a pint in one sitting doesn’t qualify as healthy eating!

Even “vegan” isn’t a license to eat unlimited portions

NadaMoo! is another ice cream alternative made with coconut milk and water; inulin, a prebiotic fiber linked to digestive health; and agave. A pint contains about 20 grams of fiber. Some flavors are “cleaner” than others in terms of the ingredients, and calories vary considerably, ranging from 240 in a pint of vanilla to 600 in a pint of chocolate peanut butter. But in my opinion, the coconut milk base in NadaMoo! creates a richness that makes a half-cup portion (which is ideal) feel just right.

Bottom line on this trend…

Splurges are perfectly fine every once in a while. But whole, fresh foods should be the main sources of your nutrients (including protein and fiber)—not dessert.

Are these healthier options better than traditional ice cream? That depends on how much you have, and how often.

If ice cream is an occasional “extra,” and you feel more satisfied with a smaller portion of the real thing, go for it. On the flip side, if you find these doctored-up versions just as satisfying as regular ice cream, and you feel better about eating them, that’s A-OK. Just remember to enjoy them as an occasional indulgence rather than an everyday treat.

What Are the Benefits of Drinking Coconut Water in the Morning?

Coconut water is one of those beverages my health conscious friends are always trying to convince me to drink more of. And though I know it’s important to stay hydrated so my organs don’t shut down and I don’t have a pounding headache, I’ve never been totally clear on the exact health benefits of drinking coconut water and why coconut water is so hydrating. Turns out that there are a couple of good reasons to drink coconut water if you want to stay hydrated, according to science, and it all starts with potassium.

Your body needs electrolytes, like potassium, in order to help keep your heartbeat regular, remove waste products from cells, and generally function well. And humans need a lot of this mineral nutrient: approximately 3,510 milligrams of potassium per day for healthy adults, according to a study conducted by the World Health Organization. But, as Arthur Gallego, global director of corporate communications at Vita Coco notes, “Potassium remains a nutrient shortfall for many people,” even though it’s “the electrolyte that helps speed hydration in the body.”

This is where coconut water comes in, because coconut water packs a lot of potassium per ounce. According to data from the US Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, one cup of coconut water has 600 milligrams of potassium. To put that in some context, a whole, large banana—the food that’s probably most associated with high levels of potassium—has less than 500 milligrams of potassium.

The hydrating benefits of potassium, and, in turn, coconut water, are why many people turn to coconut water after a night of drinking. “If you’re hungover from the night before, coconut water could be a great way to start your morning,” notes Gallego. Plus, the composition of coconut water is about 95 percent water, according to the USDA, so you’re kickstarting your daily intake of H2O, too.

There’s no reason not to drink coconut water in the morning even if you’re not looking for a hangover cure, though, and there are other benefits to drinking coconut water besides hydration. As Chris Cuvelier, CEO and founder of Zola, a company that makes both coconut water and organic hydrating energy drinks, explains, “Plant powered hydration from superfruits like coconuts help you maintain mental focus, balance your pH levels, stabilize your core temperature, and deliver important nutrients that your body needs.”

And you don’t have to worry about drinking coconut water on an empty stomach because this beverage has a low acidity. “The beverages that upset our tummies in the morning are the ones that are acidic,” explains Gallego, “like citrus juices followed by coffee.” Though mixing coconut water and coffee does seem like it could be a winning combo, especially since the hydrating properties of coconut water could offset the negative effects of caffeine. Cuvelier notes that he starts every morning with a can of Zola Coconut Water with Espresso, “which is the equivalent to two shots of espresso and has potassium to hydrate.”

Whether it’s straight out of the coconut, blended into a smoothie, or combined with a shot of espresso, there’s really no good reason not to drink coconut water in the morning—unless you’re a coconut water hater who just doesn’t like the taste of the stuff, in which case I really can’t help you.

3 Sneaky Things That Are Making You Crave Sugar

When you’re trying to keep your added sugar intake to a minimum, you know to steer clear of the obvious temptations: the office vending machine, the ice cream freezers at the supermarket, and the dessert porn that come across your Instagram feed. (And just a refresher, the recommended daily intake of added sugar for women is six teaspoons, according to the American Heart Association.)

But some sugar triggers are a lot more subtle than that, altering your physiology without you realizing it and leaving you with a strong need to rip into a party-size bag of M&Ms. If you’ve noticed that your appetite for the sweet stuff has surged, one of these three food-related factors might be to blame. Here’s how they activate your sweet tooth—and how you can get control of your cravings.

You take in too much caffeine

That double espresso you pick up on the way to work every morning might be doing more than fueling your energy. A recent study from the Journal of Food Science found that caffeine can switch up our taste buds so we perceive foods as less sweet than they actually are. When you can’t taste sweetness as well, you’re apt to consume more in order to satisfy your natural sweet tooth, the researchers suggest.

It’s a preliminary study and more research is needed to back up the findings and provide a better understanding of how caffeine alters taste buds, cautions Vandana Sheth, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (Sheth was not involved in the study.) But if your sugar jones tends to rage mid-morning after you’ve finished your morning joe, it may be worth trying a switch to decaf.

You consume artificial sweeteners

Call it the catch-22 of calorie-free drinks and low-sugar desserts. “Because non-nutritive sweeteners, or artificial sweeteners, are many times sweeter than sugar, [consuming them] trains your taste buds to appreciate hypersweet flavors,” says Atlanta–based nutritionist Marisa Moore, RD. “This may make it difficult for fruit and other less-sweet foods to measure up to that expectation.” In other words, after a steady diet of fake sugar foods, regular sugar is a letdown for your taste buds. So you finish off that tub of mint chocolate chip to try to make up for it.

A review of previous studies on artificial sweeteners published in the journal Neuroscience supports this idea, with the author of the review noting that “artificial sweeteners, precisely because they are sweet, encourage sugar craving and sugar dependence.”

Nutritionists see this effect anecdotally as well. “I can say I’ve heard from past clients that they’ve have seen a change in their tastebuds when they reduce their artificial sugar intake and eat a more balanced diet,” says Los Angeles–based Megan Roosevelt, RD.

You load up on the wrong carbs

The glycemic index measures how specific foods affect your blood sugar level. High-glycemic foods such as processed white bread, pastries, crackers, and cookies cause your blood sugar to spike soon after consuming them . . . and then crash quickly as well. With your blood sugar down, your body seeks a fast energy fix, amping your appetite for sugary sweets like a donut or candy bar, says Moore.

The trick is to consume foods that keep your blood sugar level on an even keel. So skip the high-glycemic empty carbs and load your plate with low-glycemic carbs, like fruits and veggies, minimally processed grains such as quinoa and bulgur, steel-cut oats, brown rice, and whole grain bread. These items keep your energy steady, so you don’t experience the sudden crash and subsequent craving.

High-glycemic carbs are also high in fiber, which can help promote fullness and further keep blood sugar steady, says Libby Mills, RD, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Why Jessamyn Stanley Is Obsessed With Demi Lovato’s Fabletics Collection

Unless you have been under a rock lately, then you know that last month Demi Lovato launched her second capsule collection with Fabletics, aptly named Demi Lovato for Fabletics. A robust mix of fitness and athleisure wear, this gear, with its pops of magenta and bold blue hues, had us going gaga when it debuted.

And we aren’t the only ones who are feeling these performance pieces. Yesterday morning, yogi extraordinaire and body positivity advocate Jessamyn Stanley took to Instagram Stories to praise the fitness line.

“@ddlovato X @fabletics is the first really on trend plus size athletic wear that I’ve tried on in a hot minute,” Stanley wrote on top of a photo of her sporting the brand’s Eden Bra and Blair Legging II in bright blue ($30 and $50; fabletics.com). (For the record, you look hot Jessamyn!)

Coincidentally, the outfit Stanley is crushing on is the same one Lovato rocks in the campaign images. Translation: This line, with sizes ranging from XXS-3X, not only works for a variety of body types, it also looks ah-mazing on a myriad of shapes and sizes too.

The $20 Mat Bag That Motivates Me for Yoga Class

This writer is part of Health.com’s contributor network. Learn more about the contributor network and how to join.

Sometimes the best workout gear is the bag that helps you get to your workout. Case in point: my Gaiam Tree of Wisdom Cargo Mat Bag, which motivates me to take a yoga class just so I can use it.

In the past, I’ve tried using slings to carry my yoga mat around, but they’d either pinch me, the mat would fall out, or they’d become all tangled up in my rush to get out the door. Switching to this roomy carryall, which is made of lightweight cotton and has an adjustable strap and easy zip closure, was a great decision.

7 Treatments and Lifestyle Changes That Can Help Dry Eyes

How to treat dry eye

Millions of Americans suffer from stinging, burning, blurry, and gritty-feeling eyes due to dry eye syndrome. While everyone can have dry eyes once in a while, those folks have a chronic problem due to inadequate tear production. Some people are at higher risk of dry eye than others. (Here are some of the most common dry eye risk factors).

The good news is that there are several ways to treat dry eye, including natural remedies you can try at home, over-the-counter drops, and even prescription products and procedures that get at the root of the problem. What is important is to not ignore your symptoms. Because tears contain antibodies, lubricants, and nutrients that protect the eye, leaving these eye symptoms untreated for too long can damage your eyes.

Consider your medications

Often dry eye is a side effect of medication, everything from allergy meds to painkillers to blood pressure drugs. When you seek treatment for your eye symptoms, tell your doctor about any other meds you are taking. She can tell you if one of these (here are 14 dry eye-causing medications) could be triggering your dry eye. You might be able to switch to a different medication that doesn’t cause dry eye. If that’s not possible, read on.

Try OTC eye drops

The first line of treatment for dry eye is often eye drops known as artificial tears, which are available over-the-counter. These can be especially helpful if you have mild dry eye or if the symptoms only appear once in a while. Don’t confuse them with red-eye drops, which contain medications that can lead to rebound redness and won’t treat the dry eye. And the trick is to find the right products, and use them correctly. There are many types available over-the-counter, and a doctor can help you pick the right kind to address your problem.

“They’re actually really effective but you have to be consistent,” says Janet Cushing, OD, a clinical optometrist with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health in Madison. “Some people say they tried it once but it didn’t really work. Consistent use really works.”

If you find you need the drops more than six times a day, consider using a product with no preservatives, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, or talk to your doctor about other treatments.

Wash your eyelids

Oil (meibum) is a necessary component of tears, and is produced by meibomian glands found on the rim of eyes, near your lash line. Blocked meibomian glands can lead to dry eye. Washing your eyelids regularly and using a warm washcloth as a compress can help keep inflammation under control and restore the flow of oil to the eye.

“With your eyes closed, wash along the lash line,” instructs Cushing. “You can use commercially available lid cleansers or baby shampoo. It really helps.”

Some doctors may advise doing this every day, even if symptoms have subsided.

If the at-home version of this remedy doesn’t work, ask your doctor about unblocking your oil glands in his or her office with a procedure called LipiFlow. This device provides pressure and warmth to the eye to clear blocked meibomian glands.

Plug your tear ducts

Tear ducts or puncta are located at the inner corners of your upper and lower eyelid. Their function is to drain tears away from the eye into the nose. Plugging the ducts with sterile lacrimal plugs or punctal plugs can keep both your own tears and artificial tears in the eye.

“Basically you’re just closing the duct that drains tears out of your eyes,” explains Cushing. “Usually it’s reversible with a silicone plug but you can actually cauterize and close the punctum permanently.”

Wear therapeutic contact lenses

Although regular contact lenses can actually cause dry eye if worn over the long-term, special contact lenses called scleral lenses or bandage lenses can fix the problem by protecting the surface of the eye and keeping moisture from seeping away.

Eat more omega-3s

Adding more omega-3 fatty acids to your diet may also help relieve dry eye. Dietary sources include salmon, sardines, tuna, walnuts, and flaxseed.

Ask about prescription meds

In addition to over-the-counter preparations, there are prescription remedies available. There are eye drops that contain the anti-inflammatory compound cyclosporine (Restasis) and in 2016, the FDA approved a new type of dry eye treatment called lifitegrast ophthalmic solution (Xiidra). Corticosteroids, which also control inflammation, are also available in eye drop form, although these are generally not recommended for long-term use.

Which Teas Are Healthiest?

You know that a cup of tea can do you good, but are there different health benefits to the different varieties? Black, green, oolong, and white teas all come from the same plant (Camellia sinensis). It’s how they’re processed that sets them apart and gives them their distinctive flavors. Black is made from leaves that have fully oxidized; their chemical makeup changes when they’re wilted, bruised, and exposed to air (kind of like a cut apple that sits on the counter). Oolong is partially oxidized, while green is not oxidized. White is also not oxidized, and it’s made from young leaves or buds. And they all will deliver a slightly lower buzz than a cup of coffee: it takes up to four eight-ounce cups of black tea to deliver roughly the same amount of caffeine as a cup of coffee.

Black tea

Black tea may be a heart helper. While black tea is not quite as high in flavonoid antioxidants as its green counterpart, it is good for your heart and may help reduce cholesterol levels. And it can also help boost your energy levels. Feel free to tackle your afternoon slump with black tea, which tends to have a higher caffeine content than green tea.

Green tea

Green tea is packed with good-for-you antioxidants that may keep you in great form long-term. It may also help fight certain diseases: “The polyphenols found in green tea not only reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by lowering your total and LDL cholesterol but may also reduce your risk of breast cancer,” says Sonia Oyola, MD, of the University of Chicago.

White tea

Sipping white or green tea may help with weight loss, thanks to caffeine and antioxidants called catechins. It’s also a plant powerhouse. “White tea is the least processed,” notes Dr. Oyola, “so compared with other teas, it has a higher amount of polyphenols, which are known to have antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties.”

Kombucha

Kombucha—tea that’s fermented using sugar and a starter culture from (good) bacteria and yeast—can be an excellent source of probiotics, which may help reestablish a balanced gut microbiome and improve the health of your digestive system, says Dr. Oyola. Just be aware that some varieties may contain alcohol (though usually less than 0.5 percent).

Weight loss teas

Are so-called “detox teas” for weight loss worth a try? Nope—here’s why: Some slimming teas combine caffeine with a diuretic, causing you to shed water weight, not actual fat. They may also contain herbs like senna, a natural laxative that can come with undesirable side effects (think stomach cramps and diarrhea). If your aim is fat loss, a clean diet and exercise are a safer bet, says Cynthia Sass, RD.